liver-cirrhosis-may-be-reversible
3
Liver cirrhosis may be reversible

Liver cirrhosis may be reversible

Last Reviewed : 12/25/2020
Liver cirrhosis may be reversible

You may already know that the liver is the seat of metabolism in the body. It is also the place where detoxification takes place. Cirrhosis is the most common disease that affects the liver. Well, the most common causes of cirrhosis are:

  1. Alcohol abuse
  2. Chronic Hepatitis B, C infection
  3. Fatty liver disease (seen in obese individuals).

Cirrhosis heals by fibrosis. In early stages, cirrhosis is reversible if the underlying cause is treated. In advanced stages, where the irreversible changes set in, liver transplant is the only option.

Fibrosis and Regression

Abstinence from alcohol, treatment for hepatitis B, C infection and losing weight will help in treating the disease. Regression in fibrosis may be achieved through the application of potential new anti-fibrotic strategies.

Long-term follow-up studies indicate that regression of liver fibrosis is associated with improved clinical outcomes by strengthening perceived histological regression. Although fibrosis regression remains a controversial topic, we believe that regression of fibrosis could eventually be achieved by elucidating the multiple signaling pathways involved in HSC activation as well as through the application of potential new anti-fibrotic strategies [1].

Extensive and persistent hepatic fibrosis has for a long time been considered irreversible. Accumulating evidence suggests that liver fibrosis is reversible and that recovery from cirrhosis may be possible. The application of molecular techniques to models of reversible fibrosis is helping to establish the events and processes that are critical to recovery. The problem consists of identifying and eliminating its cause. Although fibrosis in the liver has little functional significance by itself, its severity derives from associated vascular changes. Disappearance of fibrosis can be accompanied by remodeling of vascular changes. However, depending on its duration, the fibrosis may be irreversible [2].

Conclusion

Extensive and persistent hepatic fibrosis has for a long time been considered irreversible. However, recent studies on the behavior of hepatic fibrosis, especially those related to evolution and involution of advanced schistosomiasis in man, have challenged this concept. Nowadays, it is becoming clear that any type of fibrosis is reversible, including that associated with hepatic cirrhosis. The problem consists in identifying and eliminating its cause. Although fibrosis in the liver has little functional significance by itself, its severity derives from associated vascular changes. However, new data on fibrosis regression indicates that disappearance of fibrosis is usually accompanied by remodeling of vascular changes. But, there are peculiarities related to the anatomic type of fibrosis and to its functional significance, which suggests that sometimes fibrosis, may indeed be irreversible [3]. To conclude, liver cirrhosis is reversible disease.

References

  1. Jung YK, Yim HJ. Reversal of Liver Cirrhosis: Current Evidence and Expectations. Korean J Intern Med. 2017;32(2):213–228. doi:10.3904/kjim.2016.268
  2. Kumar M, Sarin SK. Is Cirrhosis of the Liver Reversible? Indian J Pediatr. 2007 Apr; 74(4):393-9.
  3. Andrade ZA. Rev Soc Bras Med Trop. 2005 Nov-Dec; 38(6):514-20. Epub 2006 Jan 4.

 

Please leave your comments:



Related Articles